At Timberland, we rate our products on a scale from 0 to 10 using a system created to compare the environmental impact of our products. The lower the score, the smaller environmental footprint associated with making it – from raw materials to finished product. To find the Green Index® rating for your shoes, please enter the SKU number in the search box above.

Not all Timberland® footwear styles have been scored using the Green Index® rating.

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Earthkeepers® Slim Cupsole Winham Hook-and-Loop Oxford

SKU: 5994R

Rating Breakdown

We score the shoe on its Climate Impact, Chemicals Used, and Resources Consumed. We average all three to get the Green Index® rating score. 1 is good. 10 is not so good.

Climate
Impact

100
3.5

Greenhouse gases, produced in making raw materials and during footwear production, contribute to climate change. Our climate impact rating measures the emissions of greenhouse gases from the production of each material to the manufacturing of the final product.

Our measurements are based on samples at the start of production. These may vary slightly as the production process is streamlined or factory origin switched, or due to natural variability in materials. Timberland calculates a pair of shoe’s climate impact using a software program called GaBi (www.gabi-software.com). We input 1) the finished mass of shoe components, 2) estimated energy use from our footwear factories and 3) publicly or commercially available data sets for the raw materials in our shoes and the electric grid in the regions where we manufacture (a list of these data sets is available on timberland.com/outdoorperformance).

Using this data, and employing an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14000 compliant framework for modeling the environmental inputs and outputs for product construction, GaBi produces a total measure of the greenhouse gases, or “carbon dioxide equivalents,” in kilograms (kg). Greenhouse gas emissions are calculated for each style of shoe being analyzed—from raw materials through production of the finished product.

The greenhouse gas measure then gets converted to our 0 to 10 Green Index® scale. A Climate Impact score of 10 represents the Timberland® shoe that emits the most greenhouse gases during production, which is 100kg or more of CO2-e (carbon dioxide equivalents). The numbers between 0–10 represent divisions of the 0-100kg of kg CO2-e scale. To achieve the best score, a 0, the emissions to produce a pair of shoes must be below 2.49 kg of CO2-e. While this methodology represents our best available means to model the climate impact of our product, there are limitations to our approach:

The data sets that we used for raw materials in GaBi are not specific to the farms and factories that manufacture materials for Timberland, as this data was not available to us. We used representative, publicly and commercially available data sets for this information.

Due to limited data availability or the proprietary constraints of suppliers, some estimation for the composition of certain synthetic materials was made. Sensitivity analysis showed that the categories of materials requiring estimation had little effect on the overall model outcomes.

Read more [+]

Chemicals
Used

100
2.0

Chemicals are used in material and footwear production to improve the performance and aesthetics of our products. Timberland is committed to eliminating the use of chemicals linked to human or environmental harm. We are developing and using safer, more environmentally conscious substitutes for common footwear components.

Chemicals are used in material and footwear production to improve the performance and aesthetics of our product. Timberland is committed to eliminating the use of chemicals linked to human or environmental harm. To that end, the company is developing and using safer, more environmentally conscious substitutes for common footwear components. The components reflected in the Chemicals Used score are polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and solvent-based adhesives. PVC, a material widely used in footwear and apparel manufacturing, as well as in a host of other industries, has been linked to environmental and health issues. Timberland has voluntarily chosen to phase out PVC from products where alternatives are available.

Solvent-based adhesives are used to glue footwear components. They can off-gas volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which, if not treated, can produce indoor and outdoor air pollution. In addition, the extra adhesive is considered hazardous waste and requires careful disposal.

Our product design team and factory partners help us identify the presence of PVC and solvent-based adhesives in each footwear style. 2.5 points are added if PVC is used in a shoe.

Solvent adhesives are commonly used in three separate areas of the shoe—the upper, the bottom and attaching the bottom to the upper. If solvent adhesives are specified in either the upper, the bottom, or to attach the two 2.5 points are added to the Chemicals Used Score. If solvent adhesives are used in all three, 7.5 points get added to the score.

Read more [+]

Resource
Consumption

100
7.0

Making a durable product requires quality materials. It's a resource intensive process that leaves a significant environmental footprint. We're focused on making our products from materials that minimize our resource consumption. Our Resource Consumption score measures how successful we are in this endeavor. The score decreases as we use materials that require less land and water and fewer chemicals to produce.

Making a durable product requires quality materials. It's a resource intensive process that leaves a significant environmental footprint. We're focused on making our products from materials that minimize our resource consumption. Our Resource Consumption score measures how successful we are in this endeavor. The score decreases as we use materials that require less land and water and fewer chemicals to produce.

Making a durable product requires quality materials. It’s a resource-intensive process that leaves a significant environmental footprint. We’re focused on making our products from materials that minimize our resource consumption. Our Resource Consumption score measures how successful we are in this endeavor. The score decreases as we use materials that require less land and water and fewer chemicals to produce. These materials include:

1) Recycled materials: Materials recycled from consumer and/or industrial waste.

2) Organic materials: Materials such as organic cotton and wool that are grown and harvested without the use of synthetic chemicals.

3) Renewable materials: Defined by Timberland as coming from a fast-growing, plant-based material that makes efficient use of non-renewable resources. Examples of these materials include hemp and bamboo. The Resource Consumption score is created by identifying the weight of components that do not fall into the three categories listed above, then dividing the weight of those components by the overall weight of the shoe. Our 0–10 Green Index® scale goes from 0 representing 100% recycled, organic and renewable material content to 10, which represents the absence of these materials. The numbers in between correspond to the gradations between 0–100%.

Read more [+]

How We Get the Green Index® Rating

Using a men’s size 9 or a women’s size 7 of the relevant model, each factor is measured on a scale from 0 to 10 using these formulas:

  • Climate Impact (kg CO2e for shoe)/10, score =10 =10
  • Chemicals (0 uses = 0, 1=2.5, 2=5, 3=7.5, 4=10)
  • Resources (wt of non-recycled, organic or renewable material/weight of shoe)

Then the 3 scores are added together and divided by three. The score with the least environmental impact is 0. A score of 10 has the highest impact.

Our measurements are based on samples at the start of production. These may vary slightly as the production process is streamlined or factory origin switched, or due to natural variability in materials.

About Green Index® Rating

Timberland® footwear uses our Green Index® rating to reflect its environmental footprint. 1 is good. 10 is not so good.

Climate Impact

Greenhouse gases, produced in making raw materials and during footwear production, contribute to climate change. Our climate impact rating measures the emissions of greenhouse gases from the production of each material to the manufacturing of the final product.

Our measurements are based on samples at the start of production. These may vary slightly as the production process is streamlined or factory origin switched, or due to natural variability in materials. Timberland calculates a pair of shoe’s climate impact using a software program called GaBi (www.gabi-software.com). We input 1) the finished mass of shoe components, 2) estimated energy use from our footwear factories and 3) publicly or commercially available data sets for the raw materials in our shoes and the electric grid in the regions where we manufacture (a list of these data sets is available on timberland.com/outdoorperformance).

Using this data, and employing an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14000 compliant framework for modeling the environmental inputs and outputs for product construction, GaBi produces a total measure of the greenhouse gases, or “carbon dioxide equivalents,” in kilograms (kg). Greenhouse gas emissions are calculated for each style of shoe being analyzed—from raw materials through production of the finished product.

The greenhouse gas measure then gets converted to our 0 to 10 Green Index® scale. A Climate Impact score of 10 represents the Timberland® shoe that emits the most greenhouse gases during production, which is 100kg or more of CO2-e (carbon dioxide equivalents). The numbers between 0–10 represent divisions of the 0-100kg of kg CO2-e scale. To achieve the best score, a 0, the emissions to produce a pair of shoes must be below 2.49 kg of CO2-e. While this methodology represents our best available means to model the climate impact of our product, there are limitations to our approach:

The data sets that we used for raw materials in GaBi are not specific to the farms and factories that manufacture materials for Timberland, as this data was not available to us. We used representative, publicly and commercially available data sets for this information.

Due to limited data availability or the proprietary constraints of suppliers, some estimation for the composition of certain synthetic materials was made. Sensitivity analysis showed that the categories of materials requiring estimation had little effect on the overall model outcomes.

Read more [+]

Chemicals Used

Chemicals are used in material and footwear production to improve the performance and aesthetics of our products. Timberland is committed to eliminating the use of chemicals linked to human or environmental harm. We are developing and using safer, more environmentally conscious substitutes for common footwear components.

Chemicals are used in material and footwear production to improve the performance and aesthetics of our product. Timberland is committed to eliminating the use of chemicals linked to human or environmental harm. To that end, the company is developing and using safer, more environmentally conscious substitutes for common footwear components. The components reflected in the Chemicals Used score are polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and solvent-based adhesives. PVC, a material widely used in footwear and apparel manufacturing, as well as in a host of other industries, has been linked to environmental and health issues. Timberland has voluntarily chosen to phase out PVC from products where alternatives are available.

Solvent-based adhesives are used to glue footwear components. They can off-gas volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which, if not treated, can produce indoor and outdoor air pollution. In addition, the extra adhesive is considered hazardous waste and requires careful disposal.

Our product design team and factory partners help us identify the presence of PVC and solvent-based adhesives in each footwear style. 2.5 points are added if PVC is used in a shoe.

Solvent adhesives are commonly used in three separate areas of the shoe—the upper, the bottom and attaching the bottom to the upper. If solvent adhesives are specified in either the upper, the bottom, or to attach the two 2.5 points are added to the Chemicals Used Score. If solvent adhesives are used in all three, 7.5 points get added to the score.

Read more [+]

Resource Consumption

Making a durable product requires quality materials. It's a resource intensive process that leaves a significant environmental footprint. We're focused on making our products from materials that minimize our resource consumption. Our Resource Consumption score measures how successful we are in this endeavor. The score decreases as we use materials that require less land and water and fewer chemicals to produce.

Making a durable product requires quality materials. It's a resource intensive process that leaves a significant environmental footprint. We're focused on making our products from materials that minimize our resource consumption. Our Resource Consumption score measures how successful we are in this endeavor. The score decreases as we use materials that require less land and water and fewer chemicals to produce.

Making a durable product requires quality materials. It’s a resource-intensive process that leaves a significant environmental footprint. We’re focused on making our products from materials that minimize our resource consumption. Our Resource Consumption score measures how successful we are in this endeavor. The score decreases as we use materials that require less land and water and fewer chemicals to produce. These materials include:

1) Recycled materials: Materials recycled from consumer and/or industrial waste.

2) Organic materials: Materials such as organic cotton and wool that are grown and harvested without the use of synthetic chemicals.

3) Renewable materials: Defined by Timberland as coming from a fast-growing, plant-based material that makes efficient use of non-renewable resources. Examples of these materials include hemp and bamboo. The Resource Consumption score is created by identifying the weight of components that do not fall into the three categories listed above, then dividing the weight of those components by the overall weight of the shoe. Our 0–10 Green Index® scale goes from 0 representing 100% recycled, organic and renewable material content to 10, which represents the absence of these materials. The numbers in between correspond to the gradations between 0–100%.

Read more [+]

How We Get the Green Index® Rating

Using a men’s size 9 or a women’s size 7 of the relevant model, each factor is measured on a scale from 0 to 10 using these formulas:

  • Climate Impact (kg CO2e for shoe)/10, score =10 =10
  • Chemicals (0 uses = 0, 1=2.5, 2=5, 3=7.5, 4=10)
  • Resources (wt of non-recycled, organic or renewable material/weight of shoe)

Then the 3 scores are added together and divided by three. The score with the least environmental impact is 0. A score of 10 has the highest impact.

Our measurements are based on samples at the start of production. These may vary slightly as the production process is streamlined or factory origin switched, or due to natural variability in materials.

What's this... a Nutrition Label for Shoes?

At Timberland®, we actually created a nutrition label to measure the environmental footprint of how we do business - that's the label you see here.

Eco-Benefits

We make footwear and outerwear with recycled, organic and renewable materials.

Recycled PET

Silver Rated Tannery

Gold Rated Tannery

Recycled Rubber

Green Rubber® Soles

SmartWool®

Organic Cotton

Recycled PET


We've been using recycled PET - the plastic from recycled plastic soda bottles - in our fleece outerwear for more than 10 years. Now we've incorporated it into the linings and laces of some our footwear.

  • Fabric made from recycled PET is strong, breathable and moisture-wicking
  • In 2009, there were 1,298,000,000 pounds of PET available for recycling in the U.S.

Silver Rated Tannery


Timberland has made a decision to source leather only from tanneries that have achieved Silver or Gold rating with regard to environmental sustainability.

  • When you see the tannery icon, it means that one or more major components uses at least 50% leather tanned in a facility rated Silver
  • The tannery rating system includes energy consumption, water usage, air emissions and waste management
  • Tests are verified by a third-party environmental audit

Gold Rated Tannery


Timberland has made an informed decision to source leather from tanneries that have achieved Silver or Gold rating with regard to environmental sustainability. This new standard is a critical tool so tanneries reduce their energy use, which in turn helps us reduce the emissions associated with leather in our products.

  • Rating system includes energy consumption, water usage, air emissions and waste management
  • Tests are verified by a third-party environmental audit

Recycled Rubber


In most of our shoes with recycled rubber outsoles, we use Green Rubber compound made with 42% recycled rubber, which is indicated by a "Green Rubber" logo. However, in some cases, when we want to make an outsole with a special color that isn't available using Green Rubber material, we use a recycled rubber compound made with 15% recycled rubber

Green Rubber® Soles


Made using 42% recycled rubber, Green Rubber compound uses a patented DeLink process that reverses the vulcanization process so that post-industrial waste rubber can be re-used and made into new products like shoe soles that provide all the traction and durability to live up to our high standards.

  • Since we started using Green Rubber material in 2008, we've produced 10 million pairs of shoes with outsoles made with recycled rubber. This has saved 3.5 million pounds of virgin rubber from being used in our footwear.

SmartWool®


Footwear with SmartWooll® fabric linings wick moisture and help keep feet cool, dry and stink-free. SmartWooll® fabric is soft, and is made from wool -- a renewable resource that can be shorn from sheep.

  • Ultra-fine merino wool helps keep feet cool when it's hot and warm when it's cold
  • Naturally resists odor-causing bacteria
  • Absorbs 30% of its weight in moisture without feeling damp

Organic Cotton


When you see the organic content icon, it means that one or more major components contains at least 50% certified organic material - like organic cotton. Grown without toxic fertilizers or pesticides, organic materials cause less harm to the ecosystem.

  • Organic content is grown without planet-harming toxic chemicals
  • No compromise in durability or appearance
  • In 2010, Timberland used 2,661,277 pounds of organic cotton

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: How do I search for my shoe?

A: To find the Green Index® rating for your shoes, please enter the SKU number in the search box in the middle of the Search page.

Q: Where do I find my SKU?

A: Your SKU can be found on the inside tag of your shoe. Alternatively, you can also find the SKU on your Timberland shoebox.

Q: Is every style of Timberland footwear scored with a Green Index® rating?

A: Not every Timberland® footwear style has been been scored with a Green Index® rating at the time of this publication. This database contains ratings for Timberland® footwear beginning with the Spring 2013 collection and will continue to be updated once a season as ratings for new products become available.

Q: What is the best Green Index® rating score?

A: The best Green Index® rating that Timberland offers is currently a 3.0 out of 10. The best score obtainable is a 0 out of 10 (Perfect score).

Q: Are these shoes available for purchase?

A: All of these shoes are available for purchase, however not all styles shown may be available in your area. The Green Index® site is home to all styles that are currently available globally meaning that some styles available to you may not be available to another country, and vice versa.

Q: Where can I learn more about Timberland's sustainability initiatives?

A: To learn more about Timberland's sustainability initiatives please visit http://responsibility.timberland.com

Q: What is a Silver/Gold rated tannery?

A: Tanneries' environmental performance is rated according to Leather Working Group (LWG) audits conducted at tanneries from which Timberland sources its leather. Tanneries are scored on a scale of Failure, Compliant, Bronze, Silver, or Gold. The LWG evaluates their audit protocol regularly to ensure scoring rewards environmental best practice. This means the bar for reaching silver and gold ratings will be raised over time.

Timberland's target is for all tanneries to be a minimum of Silver-rated, meaning that Industry-Standard Best Practices employed. For more information about the LWG auditing methodology, please visit http://www.leatherworkinggroup.com/about/award-structures.htm

Q: What is the Leather Working Group and where can I get more information?

A: The Leather Working Group (LWG) is a group of brands, retailers, product manufacturers, leather manufacturers, chemical suppliers and technical experts that have worked together to develop an environmental stewardship protocol specifically for the leather manufacturing industry. The group endeavors to promote improvement in the tanning industry by creating alignment on environmental priorities by bringing visibility to best practices and providing guidelines for continual improvement. For more information about the Leather Working Group, please visit http://www.leatherworkinggroup.com

Q: What is Organic Cotton?

A: When you see the organic content icon, it means that one or more major components contains at least 50% certified organic material—like organic cotton. Grown without toxic fertilizers or pesticides, organic materials cause less harm to the ecosystem. All organic content is grown without planet-harming toxic chemicals. There is also no compromise in durability or appearance. In 2010, Timberland used 2,661,277 pounds of organic cotton

Q: What is SmartWool® and where can I get more information about it?

A: Footwear with SmartWool® fabric linings wick moisture and help keep feet cool, dry and stink-free. SmartWool® fabric is soft, and is made from wool -- a renewable resource that can be shorn from sheep. Ultra-fine merino wool helps keep feet cool when it’s hot and warm when it’s cold. It Naturally resists odor-causing bacteria and absorbs 30% of its weight in moisture without feeling damp. For more information about SmartWool®, please visit www.smartwool.com

Q: What is Green Rubber?

A: Green Rubber compound is made from 42% recycled rubber. Recycled rubber helps minimize landfill waste and Green Rubber soles offer no compromise in traction or durability when compared to ordinary soles.

Q: What is PET or polyethylene terephthalate and where does it come from?

A: PET or Polyethylene Terephthalate is the plastic from recycled soda bottles. We've been using recycled PET in our fleece outerwear for more than 10 years. Now we've incorporated it into the linings and laces of our footwear.